Bushmills Irish Whiskey

Bushmills

There once again, this being Ireland, it’s likewise irregular of the conventional Irish pot-still style insofar as it doesn’t utilize a mix of malted and unmalted barley. It’s not quite like a normal Scottish malt distillery as it uses triple distillation and unpeated malt-though so do Auchentoshan and Springbank’s Hazelburn.It’s an intricate process, as master distiller David Quinn discusses. In more recent times, ex-manager Frank McHardy nipped throughout the sea to Campbeltown’s Springbank distillery- no surprise he’s behind the triple distilled, unpeated Hazelburn!Where Bushmills differs from any Scottish distillery is by being house to blends as well as single malts-most significantly the spectacular Black Bush, a blend of 5Oper cent Bushmills single malt and grain from Midleton. Bushmills follows the Irish Distillers ‘policy of utilizing a high percentage of first-fill sherry and Bourbon wood, both of them wood types loaded with effective flavours. This reveals finest in the Triple Wood, a single malt at first aged in ex-Bourbon and sherry wood for 16 years before the 2 elements are wed together and then recasked into port pipelines for up to a year.

It’s not rather like a typical Scottish malt distillery as it uses triple distillation and unpeated malt-though so do Auchentoshan and Springbank’s Hazelburn.It’s an intricate procedure, as master distiller David Quinn discusses. In more recent times, ex-manager Frank McHardy nipped throughout the sea to Campbeltown’s Springbank distillery- no surprise he’s behind the triple distilled, unpeated Hazelburn!Where Bushmills varies from any Scottish distillery is by being home to blends as well as single malts-most notably the spectacular Black Bush, a blend of 5Oper cent Bushmills single malt and grain from Midleton. Bushmills follows the Irish Distillers ‘policy of utilizing a high percentage of first-fill sherry and Bourbon wood, both of them wood types loaded with effective flavours.

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